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what I have come to understand
By john5
12/1/2012 4:03:50 PM
We all feel empty sometimes, and acting out is a way to feel better. we know this, and our brains know nothing better than to urge us to use the addiction as a tool. even though we are aware that the addiction is what's making us feel empty in the first place most of the time, the immediate urge to feel better often trumps the will to BE better. If we choose to BE better, we must allow the emotional pains and feelings of emptiness to run its course...like a flu. Making us stronger and more resistant, all the while we do this we become less dependent on the addiction, to the point where we no longer feel the urge to use it to bail us out of emotional pain anymore. Then, as long as we find other ways to deal with pain every day, and never look back at the addiction as an option, (because it will never stop lurking behind us, asking us to use it) we will be forever free

Comments:

Good point    
"Sooooo many times I've acted out just so I didn't have to experience the pain of the years of self-inflicted injury."
posted at 13:07:57 on December 2, 2012 by G1rlie


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"Nothing is beyond [Christ’s] redeeming reach or His encircling empathy. Therefore, we should not complain about our own life’s not being a rose garden when we remember who wore the crown of thorns! Having bled at every pore, how red His raiment must have been in Gethsemane, how crimson that cloak! No wonder, when Christ comes in power and glory, that He will come in reminding red attire, signifying not only the winepress of wrath, but also to bring to our remembrance how He suffered for each of us in Gethsemane and on Calvary!"

— Neal A. Maxwell

General Conference May 1987