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A Good Book
By Connie
1/13/2007 1:11:21 PM
For those of you who like to read, I recently read a good book about forgiveness. It is called "Left to Tell: Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust" by Immaculee Ilibagiza. It is the true story of a woman who survived the Rwandan holocaust by hiding in a bathroom for 91 days. Most of her family was killed by people who she used to call friends and neighbors. It is a very sad story, but I felt so moved by her capacity to forgive the people who slaughtered her family. Definitely worth the read. One warning, though, it does have some graphic scenes in it, so if you have a weak stomach you might want to pass. I thought it was tastefully handled (the violence).

When I read this book, I thought, how would I ever be able to forgive someone who had murdered my entire family, let alone hundreds of murderers? It made my problems seem not so big. I thought it was a really inspiring book.

Another good read is the first article in the January 2007 Ensign by James E. Faust. He talks about Satan and his methods and how we can learn to live righteously despite the whirlwind of temptations Satan has unleashed on the world.

Comments:

President Faust    
"I thought Presidents Faust article in the Ensign was great. I also found this talk given to the young adults in September. It was given by Henry B. Eyring and has kind of the same theme. I thought you all might like it. The link is http://www.lds.org/library/display/0%2C4945%2C538-1-3751-1%2C00.html."
posted at 22:16:06 on January 25, 2007 by Anonymous


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"Each one who resolves to climb that steep road to recovery must gird up for the fight of a lifetime. But a lifetime is a prize well worth the price. This challenge uniquely involves the will, and the will can prevail. Healing doesn’t come after the first dose of any medicine. So the prescription must be followed firmly, bearing in mind that it often takes as long to recover as it did to become ill. But if made consistently and persistently, correct choices can cure. "

— Russell M. Nelson

General Conference, October 1988