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Sacrament
By anon16
4/8/2012 5:52:38 PM
How do you know when you've partaken unworthily, and what are the consequences thereof?

I acted out last essentially 2 weeks ago. I took the sacrament then, knew I shouldn't have, had a discussion with my Bishop over it, but he still didn't tell me either way.

Because of general conference, it wasn't an issue last week. Last night, I felt the spirit very strongly, and I felt that I could and should take the sacrament. I'd prayed for a witness, and thought I'd received one.

Today, as I took it, the bread stuck in my throat, and I had a awful feeling. I knew at that point that I shouldn't have taken it. I don't want to feel in darkness like I did before, but I already do. I just don't know what to do.

I texted my bishop asking how long I should refrain. I'm just so confused. He didn't give me an answer either way, and I feel like it was a. Test and I failed.

Comments:

I would give myself a break    
"The fact that you're so concerned about whether or not you're worthy is a great sign. If you partook of the sacrament unworthily and feel bad about it, then you should ask for forgiveness and move on.

3 Nephi 18:28-29 summarizes Christ's instructions to his disciples concerning the sacrament:

“Ye shall not suffer any one knowingly to partake of my flesh and blood unworthily, when ye shall minister it; for whoso eateth and drinketh my flesh and blood unworthily eateth and drinketh damnation to his soul”

In my opinion, the word "damnation" in this passage refers to a halting of progress, or being stuck. I don't think it necessarily means a great curse or judgment from God. The reason we stop taking sacrament is so we can repent. If we keep taking it and pretend that everything is fine when it's not, then we are halting our progress and denying ourselves the chance to repent.

I have been in your situation before. I've taken sacrament when I was unsure, and then I've immediately regretted doing so. What helped most for me was going to the bishop, explaining how I felt, and then abstaining from sacrament until the bishop and the Spirit told me I was ready.

You're going to be fine, Anon. Your heart is in the right place, and I know the Lord will help you find the peace and worthiness you're looking for."
posted at 11:58:56 on April 9, 2012 by ETTE
My two bits    
"My personal opinion is that if the bishop knows where you are at and hasn’t told you not to partake then there doesn’t need to be a long time before partaking after you have slipped. My guess is you are being too hard on yourself. Maybe when you partook right after you shouldn’t have, but the recent one was probably just self-abuse. The question I have often asked myself is where is my attitude when partaking? If I have just relapsed and don’t feel worthy I examine why I think I should or shouldn’t partake. Am I motivated to make a commitment with God? Read the prayers. To me they are a promise of what we are telling the Lord we will do. On the other side is my main motivation pride? Do I just not want to look bad by not partaking?

Don’t be too hard on yourself, but on the other hand don’t rationalize or let yourself slide when you need to be tough with yourself. I have found that a hard one to judge sometimes.

Love,
John"
posted at 12:11:11 on April 11, 2012 by justjohn
I agree with everything above.. Read the book "beleiving Christ"    
"I dont think you have to be perfect to partake. You have to be willing to work on becoming perfect. thats what the sacrament prayer says. willing to take on his name and obey his commandments.

I think the bishop would be looking for patterns where one isnt trying or cant seem to get any traction on some sin."
posted at 12:48:28 on April 11, 2012 by Anonymous


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